Crucial Elements of the Pollutant Release and Transfer Register as related to the Stockholm Convention

This report is focused on how PRTR can be used for free access to information about pollution releases and transfers by different groups of chemicals, but also to show that it can be useful for the industry to address loopholes in its technology, as well as to save money on leaching chemicals that are used as a source in the production process.

  • Author: Jindřich Petrlík (Arnika)
  • Contributors: : Lee Bel (National Toxics Network, IPEN); Kristina Žulkovská (Arnika)
  • Number of pages: 38
  • Language: English
  • Publication date: December 2018

Introduction

The process of the preparation of a Pollutant Release and Transfer Register (PRTR) in Thailand has been ongoing at least since 2011, when JICA started a pilot project in Rayong Province (Kondo and Limjirakan 2013, Pollution Control Department and Industrial Estate Authority of Thailand 2015). However, EARTH and its NGO forerunner, CAIN (Campaign for Alternative Industry Network), were deeply involved in the preparation of the PRTR in Thailand. CAIN advocated the introduction of a PRTR in Thailand as long ago as 2003 (Saetang 2013). The call for a Right to Know among Thai civil society has an even longer history, starting after the chemical explosion at the Bangkok Central Port (the Klong Toey Case) on March 2, 1991.

The perception of the evaluation of a PRTR in Thailand describes quite well all the concerns of Thai industry regarding the introduction of a PRTR (Kondo and Limjirakan 2013), and, according to our experience from the Czech Republic, they are very similar in each country where this unique system is introduced.

Our report is focused on demonstrating how a PRTR can be used not only for free access to information about pollution releases and transfers of different groups of chemicals but also to show that it can be useful for industry to address loopholes in its technology as well as to save money on leaching chemicals that are used in the production process. We tried also to address the relationship of the PRTR system to the Stockholm Convention and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) at the same time, as it is an issue that has been much discussed in recent years. The bulk of the report is based on the practical experience of the Arnika Association with the implementation of the Czech PRTR.

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